Barrels of Beans and Bacon

[dropcap]O[/dropcap]ne of the main items to be imported into the colony during the gold rush were barrels of beans and bacon. Beans and bacon were considered food staples back then. As one goldseeker remarked:

“At the inn here we enjoyed what our Yankee companions called a ‘square meal,’ of the generally characteristic fare of the colony, bacon and beans; the latter are abundantly imported in barrels from the States. Here also, after our toilsome march, we indulged in a good wash, the only really cheap comfort obtainable in British Columbia.”

Not only did merchants import kegs of bacon and barrels of beans but also:
crushed sugar
Golden Gate Flour
Hope Butter
Rio Coffee
J & H Lard
Black Tea
Turk’s Island Salt
mats of China Rice
boxes of Macy’s candles
Harvey’s Scotch Whiskey in Puncheons
Holland Gin in Pipes
Champagne Cider in Barrels and Kegs
Edinborough Ale in Stone Jugs or bulk
Bottled Porter
India Pale Ale in pints and quarts
dried apples
hot whiskey punches
barley
bran

Viscount Milton and Dr. Cheadle stayed at J.D. Cusheon’s hotel in the Cariboo district of British Columbia in 1863 at the height of the gold rush:

Our quarters at Cusheon’s Hotel were vile. A blanket spread on the floor of a loft was our bedroom, but the swarms of lice which infested the place and rendered sleep almost impossible, and made us think with regret on the soft turf of the prairie, or a mossy couch in the woods. The fare, limited to beefsteaks, bread and dried apples, was wretchedly cooked and frightfully expensive. Beef was worth fifty cents or two shillings a pound, flour the same, a “drink” of anything except water was half a dollar, nor could the smallest article, even a box of matches, be bought for less than a “quarter” -one shilling. Before we reached Williams Creek we paid a dollar and a quarter, or five shillings, for a single pint bottle of stout.

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